MSOL Logo Final-01The Kentucky Medical Association Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program is designed to promote community involvement, as well as to give students an opportunity to learn more about the political, social and economic issues in the health care system. Those who complete the program will be recognized by KMA.

Participants in the MSOL Program must complete four steps.

  1. Complete an online webinar.
  2. Complete a public health outreach project.
  3. Attend the KMA Legislative Advocacy Presentation held at the local Medical School.
      1. Health Care in Kentucky – Overview of the medical industry, health and the marketplace in Kentucky
      2. Basics of Health Care Finance (Part 1) – Overview of the health care financial system, including the basics of Medicare, Medicaid and the physician reimbursement services
      3. Basics of Health Care Finance (Part 2) – Continuing discussion of the basics regarding the business of medicine, along with an overview of employment contracting issuesAttend one of the other KMA medical student presentations being held at the local Medical School.

Contact Laura Hartz at hartz@kyma.org for more information.

23 Students among MSOL Program Inaugural Class

Twenty-three medical students from the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville were recognized in the first class of KMA’s Medical Student Outreach and Leadership (MSOL) Program. The recognition took place at the 2016 Annual Meeting during the KMA Leadership Dinner on Saturday, Sept. 10. at the Louisville Marriott East.

The MSOL program is designed to promote community involvement, as well as to give students an opportunity to learn more about the political, social and economic issues in the health care system. The program also strives to get students involved in their communities.

The first class of graduates of the KMA Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program were recognized during the 2016 KMA Annual Meeting. Pictured are Abby Baumgartle, front row left, Sreeja Sanampudi, Mallika Sabharwal, Elizabeth Mirsky; Melinda Ruberg, middle row left, Mary Jane Schumacher, Samantha Edwards, Wesley Field; Valerie Wolf, back row left, Ryan Blackburn, David Hagan, Grant McKenzie and Christian Moser.

The first class of graduates of the KMA Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program were recognized during the 2016 KMA Annual Meeting. Pictured are Abby Baumgartle, front row left, Sreeja Sanampudi, Mallika Sabharwal, Elizabeth Mirsky and Stella Achenjang; Melinda Ruberg, middle row left, Mary Jane Schumacher, Samantha Edwards, Wesley Field; Valerie Wolf, back row left, Ryan Blackburn, David Hagan, Grant McKenzie and Christian Moser.

Family Ties and a Desire to Help Provide Guidance for Christian Moser

 

Christian Moser’s family background, combined with a determination to have a positive impact in people’s lives, drove him down the path to become a physician.

His father, Neal Moser, M.D., a pulmonologist, serves on the KMA Board of Trustees and the KMA Commission on Legislative and Political Advocacy. His mother, Kim, a registered nurse, was elected last year to represent the 64th district in the Kentucky House of Representatives. She is also the first non-physician in the country elected to chair a physicians’ political action committee. Moser also has three uncles who are physicians and multiple cousins who are nurses and dentists.

But his biggest role models are his grandfathers, Roy Moser, M.D., who helped start a practice in Northern Kentucky where his father works today, and Floyd Poore, M.D., a recently retired hospitalist who ran for governor of Kentucky in 1991.

“To me, they’re proof that a good physician can earn the love and respect of their whole community simply by showing up, doing their job to the best of their ability, and by treating each patient with respect and more than just a problem to be resolved,” he said.

“Medicine is all I’ve ever known,” said Moser, who is in his second year of medical school at the University of Louisville.

His family background was just one contributing factor to his decision to become a doctor. He had the opportunity to shadow physicians during two medical mission trips to Nicaragua and that helped confirm his choice. 

“I wanted to work in a field where I can get to know people on a personal level, to hear their story, so to speak,” said Moser. “At the same time, I wanted to have the greatest possible positive impact on their life. Once I started shadowing, it didn’t take me long to see that the doctor-patient relationship is the best of both worlds.”

During a medical/dental mission trip to Nicaragua with a cousin his sophomore year, Moser got to see firsthand how doctors can have a positive impact on patients’ lives. After examining two siblings and determining they had a parasitic infection caused by malnourishment, one of the doctors helped buy food for the family.

“The mother broke down crying, she was so grateful,” Moser said. Another patient was an obese woman who didn’t know she had diabetes. “No one explained to her that her diet could cause diabetes,” Moser said. “We taught her everything we could about how to manage her diet and where to go from there.”

Moser grew up in Taylor Mill, Ky., and is the middle child of five boys. “My two older brothers would fight and my two younger brothers would fight and I would just fly under the radar,” he said, laughing.

After graduating from Summit Country Day School in Cincinnati, Ohio, Moser majored in political science at UofL. “Politics, aside from being something that fascinates me, shapes just about everything we do,” he said.

His personal involvement in politics began in high school when he did a two-week internship in Washington for former Congressman Geoff Davis. Then, during his freshman year of college, he interned with state Rep. Sal Santoro, answering phones and emails. Today, as president of UofL’s Medical Student Section, he encourages his classmates to get in touch with their legislators. “These are our representatives,” he said. “They take the things we say very seriously.”

Moser is a member of the first class of KMA’s Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program (MSOL), which, Moser said, “is perfectly designed to fit with our crazy, hectic schedules.”

With just four course requirements, students learn the basics of Medicare and Medicaid, how to negotiate contracts, health care demographics in Kentucky and the nation, and how to contact legislators and write resolutions to directly influence the political process.

“With the amazing resources provided through KMA, the American Medical Association and the Greater Louisville Medical Society, we’re showing medical students exactly how they can address the shortfalls of health care in Kentucky, and to cause real change at an institutional level,” he said.

 

msol-graduates

Liz Mirsky
Motivated by Family, Friends, Church and Community Service

 

elizabeth-mirsky-resized

Theodore H. Miller, M.D., Ph.D., KMA 2015-2016 President, congratulations Liz Mirsky with the KMA Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program certificate for completing the program in 2016.

Liz Mirsky “fell in love” with medicine when she was in grade school. In fact, her friends called her “the mom.”

“I always had this yearning to make sure that everybody in the group was cared for and that everybody had what they needed,” Mirsky said. “I realized this would be a really useful trait to have in someday caring for people in my own clinic or in my office.”

At that point, she said, medicine became her constant motivation. She shadowed and volunteered in high school and never wavered from her desire to be a doctor—“it only grew.”

That desire to pursue a medical career was complemented by the work ethic she saw in her parents, who faced the challenge of not only settling their young family in the United States, but also learning the language and culture.

Mirsky was five when her parents moved to Lexington from Bulgaria in 2000. Her father, Alex, was a pro basketball player with the Bulgarian National Team, but his career was over by the time Liz and her sister, Becky, were born. Her mother, Ellie, had a master’s degree in Arabic.

The couple was looking for better jobs and opportunities for their children.

“That’s when we won the Green Card Lottery and left everything behind to come to the U.S.,” she said. “We brought whatever we could carry, hopped on a plane and came to the U.S. in search of new opportunities.”

But it wasn’t as easy as all that. The couple’s first priority was to learn English. “They read whatever they could get their hands on and TV was helpful,” Mirsky said.

She counts her parents’ dedication and hard work among the reasons she decided to become a doctor.

“I got to watch what my parents were willing to do to support their family,” she said. “They were so persistent; they kept going to school all while they were working to support the family.”

Her father is a nurse at St. Joseph East Hospital in Lexington and her mother is an accountant at Comfort Keepers in Lexington, a private service that hires out nurses.

They set an example and instilled in Mirsky that “I could do anything I put my mind to,” she said. “No matter how hard it would be, I knew I’d have their support. They gave me a good work ethic.”

As she enters her third year of medical school at the University of Kentucky, she is looking forward to exploring her interests in pediatrics, possibly in anesthesiology or oncology, and OB/GYN.

When KMA established the Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program (MSOL) in 2015, Mirsky knew she had to sign up.

“Yes, I have shadowed and volunteered, but I’d only seen the clinic side of things,” she said. “I knew I needed to learn more about things like health care and finances.”

The MSOL program includes a series of “Lunch and Learn” presentations aimed at helping medical students prepare for the challenges facing them in their professional careers. Mirsky especially liked the subject of local health care in Kentucky.

“Now that everything’s potentially going to change, learning the basis … and some of the specifics of what it needs to be, I think that will be helpful for me to make sense of whatever new thing comes our way,” she said. “I think the lectures in the MSOL program really gave me a good foundation.”

While the Lunch and Learn presentations are open to any student at UK and the University of Louisville, gaining the MSOL recognition requires participants to complete a public health outreach project. Mirsky’s community involvement has been vast. She recently got involved with the Salvation Army Clinic in Lexington where she is the smoking cessation officer. She leads a support group for the women every Tuesday. “Seeing their dedication and the efforts they put into quitting is really another inspiration for me,” she said.

Mirsky enjoys playing the piano in her spare time and plays every weekend at the Lexington Seventh-day Adventist Church where she is a member. She studied piano at the School for the Creative and Performing Arts at Lafayette High School but knew music wasn’t going to be her career. “I pretty much had my eyes set on being a doctor in grade school,” she said.

She also likes to read. She says with a laugh she reads “any non-textbook material—any book I can get my hands on. My library is stacked both horizontally and vertically.”

Mirsky is among the first class of 23 MSOL graduates. “I think it was very well planned out,” she said about the program. “They gave us the dates of the lectures in advance, which is always so appreciated for medical students. I think the content and the information they taught was very valuable.”

“I think if would be helpful to all medical students.”

Stella Achenjang
Preventive Care and Public Policy Are Focus of this Future Physician

 

Theodore H. Miller, M.D., Ph.D., KMA 2015-2016 President, congratulations Stella Achenjang with the KMA Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program certificate for completing the program in 2016.

Nadine-Stella Achenjang, who goes by “Stella,” credits her family as her role models.

“I’m so proud of all my siblings,” she said. “They continue to inspire me to do better. We encourage each other to push forward and to do better.”

One of five children, Achenjang falls in the middle. Her older sister Joyce graduated from medical school last year and is in residency at Saint Louis University. Her oldest brother Roland has an MBA and is a director of pharmacy. Her younger brother Gilmore is working in finance.  And her youngest brother Niven started college at Stanford this year.

She is also inspired by her father, Fidelis, and her mother, Lucia, who moved the family to the U.S. from Cameroon, West Africa, in 2000.

“For them to just pick up and move to a foreign country for their children and having to start all over in a place that’s foreign to them— I think they’re amazing,” she said.

Her dad is a chemistry professor at Union College in Barbourville and her mother is a nurse at Christian Care Communities in Corbin.

With these family achievements she jokes, “I can’t be the black sheep in the family.”

She’s well on her way to success. Achenjang is a second year medical school student at the University of Kentucky, where she earned a bachelor of arts in biology and a minor in Spanish.

Her interest in medicine was sparked when she took an anatomy class at Knox Central High School. “I was fascinated with how our bodies work and I needed to know more,” she said.

Achenjang decided to further explore her interest in medicine and participated in the Summer Medical and Dental Education Program at the University of Louisville after graduating high school. “This program focused on showing students what medical school was like,” she said.

“During this course, we learned a lot about diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome,” she said. “That got me thinking about preventive medicine and preventive care. I know whatever I end up doing, I want to somehow get involved in preventive care.”

She also participated in the Professional Education Preparation Program at UofL and at UK.

“These programs helped me to become more of an individual because I was away from home, away from my family and in a city I didn’t know,” she said.

In addition to these programs, she also recommends KMA’s Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program (MSOL), which helps medical students prepare for the challenges facing them in their professional careers.

“I have an interest in public policy—it’s a long term goal for me,” she said. “I know the Kentucky Medical Association is a great advocate for physicians and patients and they do a lot with policy. That got me interested in the program.

“Also, it’s great info and free food also never hurts,” she laughed. “You get a good lunch and learn about being a physician in Kentucky.”

Achenjang understands the importance of community involvement, a requirement of the MSOL program. “If you see a need in the community, you work to be a patient advocate.”

As the undergraduate liaison for the Student National Medical Association at UK, she works closely with the Multicultural Association of Pre-Health Students on campus. This year the associations hosted a regional educational conference. “The focus was on nutritional disparities and how difficult it is for people in the lower socio economic class or certain areas to receive good nutrition.”

Achenjang is also the community service chair for the UK Global Health Alliance and is a member of the UK Pediatrics Interest Group.

Achenjang cited another benefit of KMA’s MSOL program: “You learn things you don’t think about, like insurance.”

She said she learned about “the fight between insurance companies and physicians.”

“The insurance company sets the prices, not the physician or the hospital, which I thought was kind of crazy,” she said. “I don’t know why that’s OK.”

She enjoys running, exercising, cooking and traveling.  “Any chance I get to go somewhere I am gone,” she says. She’s traveled mostly to Spanish-speaking countries through study abroad and medical trips.

She hopes to use her knowledge of Spanish in her medical future. To keep up her skills, she has helped teach English to the Hispanic workers at Keeneland, is involved in a Spanish club at UK, reads her Bible in Spanish and writes in her journal in Spanish.

After medical school, she’s interested in working abroad, but says she needs to stay in the U.S. to help pay off her loans first.

“I’m keeping it very open,” she said.  “I want to do global health.”

Christian Moser
Family Ties and a Desire to Help Provide Guidance for Christian Moser

 

Theodore H. Miller, M.D., Ph.D., KMA 2015-2016 President, congratulations Christian Moser with the KMA Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program certificate for completing the program in 2016.

Christian Moser’s family background, combined with a determination to have a positive impact in people’s lives, drove him down the path to become a physician.

His father, Neal Moser, M.D., a pulmonologist, serves on the KMA Board of Trustees and the KMA Commission on Legislative and Political Advocacy. His mother, Kim, a registered nurse, was elected last year to represent the 64th district in the Kentucky House of Representatives. She is also the first non-physician in the country elected to chair a physicians’ political action committee. Moser also has three uncles who are physicians and multiple cousins who are nurses and dentists.

But his biggest role models are his grandfathers, Roy Moser, M.D., who helped start a practice in Northern Kentucky where his father works today, and Floyd Poore, M.D., a recently retired hospitalist who ran for governor of Kentucky in 1991.

“To me, they’re proof that a good physician can earn the love and respect of their whole community simply by showing up, doing their job to the best of their ability, and by treating each patient with respect and more than just a problem to be resolved,” he said.

“Medicine is all I’ve ever known,” said Moser, who is in his second year of medical school at the University of Louisville.

His family background was just one contributing factor to his decision to become a doctor. He had the opportunity to shadow physicians during two medical mission trips to Nicaragua and that helped confirm his choice.

“I wanted to work in a field where I can get to know people on a personal level, to hear their story, so to speak,” said Moser. “At the same time, I wanted to have the greatest possible positive impact on their life. Once I started shadowing, it didn’t take me long to see that the doctor-patient relationship is the best of both worlds.”

During a medical/dental mission trip to Nicaragua with a cousin his sophomore year, Moser got to see firsthand how doctors can have a positive impact on patients’ lives. After examining two siblings and determining they had a parasitic infection caused by malnourishment, one of the doctors helped buy food for the family.

“The mother broke down crying, she was so grateful,” Moser said. Another patient was an obese woman who didn’t know she had diabetes. “No one explained to her that her diet could cause diabetes,” Moser said. “We taught her everything we could about how to manage her diet and where to go from there.”

Moser grew up in Taylor Mill, Ky., and is the middle child of five boys. “My two older brothers would fight and my two younger brothers would fight and I would just fly under the radar,” he said, laughing.

After graduating from Summit Country Day School in Cincinnati, Ohio, Moser majored in political science at UofL. “Politics, aside from being something that fascinates me, shapes just about everything we do,” he said.

His personal involvement in politics began in high school when he did a two-week internship in Washington for former Congressman Geoff Davis. Then, during his freshman year of college, he interned with state Rep. Sal Santoro, answering phones and emails. Today, as president of UofL’s Medical Student Section, he encourages his classmates to get in touch with their legislators. “These are our representatives,” he said. “They take the things we say very seriously.”

Moser is a member of the first class of KMA’s Medical Student Outreach and Leadership Program (MSOL), which, Moser said, “is perfectly designed to fit with our crazy, hectic schedules.”

With just four course requirements, students learn the basics of Medicare and Medicaid, how to negotiate contracts, health care demographics in Kentucky and the nation, and how to contact legislators and write resolutions to directly influence the political process.

“With the amazing resources provided through KMA, the American Medical Association and the Greater Louisville Medical Society, we’re showing medical students exactly how they can address the shortfalls of health care in Kentucky, and to cause real change at an institutional level,” he said.